Columbia Reactor 35
Credit: Gary Davidson

Columbia Reactor 35

($130; 2°C; 2 lb/900 g)

Columbia brings 74 years of outerwear experience to its first line of sleeping bags. The water-repellent shell fabric and Omni-Heat liner—which reflects body warmth like a space blanket but also wicks and breathes—are borrowed from their apparel. The improved heat retention allowed Columbia to reduce the thickness of the synthetic fill, compared to similarly rated bags. A handy pocket just outside the hooded top is perfect for stashing a headlamp or watch.
Selk’bag 4G Lite
Credit: Gary Davidson

Selk’bag 4G Lite

($100; 7°C; 3.5 lb/1.6 kg)

More like a down suit than a bag, we could even walk around or eat while wearing the Selk’bag (it has scuff pads on the feet, a water-repellent coating and hand holes with Velcro closures). When it was time to hit the hay, we just lay down on our sleeping pad. Plus, we were able to sprawl any way we liked, which we loved; our tent mate, not so much.
Sierra Designs Pyro Maniac 15/30
Credit: Gary Davidson

Sierra Designs Pyro Maniac 15/30

($350; –1°C or –7°C; 2.4 lb/1.1 kg to 3 lb/1.4 kg)

At home, you pull another blanket out of the closet when nights get colder. The Sierra Designs Pyro works on the same logic. The –1°C bag comes with a mini-duvet that clips into a sleeve over the body’s core, adding 6°C of warmth. It’s an ingenious system that extends the usability of the bag into the shoulder season. The combo is a little bulky, but two bags for the price of one is pretty sweet.
Sea to Summit Traverse Xt1
Credit: Gary Davidson

Sea to Summit Traverse Xt1

($480; –7°C; 2.4 lb/1.1 kg)

It’s as though this bag has a built-in thermometer and dehumidifier. Unzip the bag up to its full length for cooling, or cinch the hood to make the most of the 850-fill down. A water-resistant outer shell blocks out condensation, a synthetic barrier above the feathers lets body moisture breathe, and a dedicated zip vents the footbox. To cut weight, Sea to Summit puts extra down on the top side, relying on the sleeping pad to make up the difference.
The North Face Aleutian 1S BX
Credit: Gary Davidson

The North Face Aleutian 1S BX

($80; 13°C; 1.6 lb/716 g)

This North Face bag is all about warm-weather comfort. With a full zip and hood, it’s just right for the variable summer camping weather in Canada’s southern latitudes and low elevations (or for tropical travels). But don’t hide it in storage come September—the Aleutian packs small and slips neatly into a three-season bag to create winter-worthy warmth. Plus, the liner is pleasantly smooth next to skin, and there’s a sneaky watch pocket.
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