While the rest of the country transitions into spring, Canada’s northern territories are still in the grip of winter — but that’s a good thing for those of us who haven’t had enough snow-time yet. Spring is, ironically, the best season for "winter"adventure in the north. Temperatures are more bearable (for sissy southerners) and the days are long enough to enjoy extended hours of activity. If you’re looking to turn the clock backwards into winter, head north of 60 this spring:

Nunavut's Toonik Tyme
Credit: Canadian Tourism Commission

Nunavut's Toonik Tyme

Take in some Toonik Tyme in Iqaluit. Running from April 12 to 16, this annual event commemorates the end of a long, dark winter with five days of festivities. Toonik Tyme begins with the ceremonial lighting of the qulliq (seal oil lamp) and continues with throat singing (all are welcome to try), ice golf, skijoring (the merging of dogsledding and Nordic skiing), igloo building, ice fishing, ice carving, snowmobile races and plenty of caribou stew. Toonik Tyme
Northern Lights in Yellowknife
Credit: Canadian Tourism Commission

Northern Lights in Yellowknife

The combination of ideal distance from the magnetic pole, a relatively flat topography, simple access (prime viewing is right around Yellowknife) and plenty of tour operators makes taking advantage of the Northwest Territories’ 240 nights per year of aurora activity a no-brainer. In March, when the night skies are still dark and activity is high, a three-night stay in Yellowknife is a virtual guarantee of seeing some jaw-dropping Northern Light displays. Try to stay silent — it is said the lights whisper stories to those who can hear. Tourism NWT
Dogsled in the Yukon
Credit: Tourism Yukon

Dogsled in the Yukon

Muktuk Adventures, near Whitehorse, offers dogsled tours ranging from day-long trips up the Dawson Trail, to hands-on training and sled-dog care at their 45-hectare ranch, right up to multi-day expeditions into the Arctic. At day’s end, let co-owner Frank Turner regale you with tales from his first-place finish at the 1,600 km Yukon Quest dogsled race — or stories from the other 23 times he competed too (including 10 top six finishes). Winter dogsled tours typically run until the end of March. Muktuk Adventures
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