Are you brave enough to camp in the snow? Good for you! You'll need the right gear though — from a sleeping bag, to an air-mat, to the right tent:

Columbia Omni-Heat Sleeping Bag Liner — $99

Columbia Omni-Heat Sleeping Bag Liner — $99

Unless you're dedicated, the cost of a winter sleeping bag (anywhere from several hundred to more than $1,000) may scare you out of a tent and into a cabin. But there’s no reason — instead, slide this sleeping bag liner into your three-season bag. Light synthetic insulation is lined with Columbia's heat reflecting and moisture wicking Omni-Heat liner, bumping warmth by five to 10 degrees Celsius, enough to handle light winter camping duty and save yourself a pile of money. Columbia
Easton Torrent 2 — $399

Easton Torrent 2 — $399

A good winter tent should be strong enough to deflect winter storms, shed snow and have roomy vestibules for all the extra gear the snowy season requires. The Torrent hits three-for-three with a four-pole design that can take a licking and two roomy vestibules. The interior fabric body seals the tent from wind and snow and there's plenty of room for two people and gear. Bonus: at only 3.5 kg and lots of venting options, it could be your year-round tent. Easton Tents
Exped DownMat XP 9 — $260

Exped DownMat XP 9 — $260

With 250 grams of 700-fill goose down inside, air-mats don't get much warmer than the DownMat XP 9. And, since blowing up an air mat adds moisture and wet down doesn't do much insulating, Exped includes an inflation sack, which doubles as a waterproof stuff sack. Attach the nozzle, scoop air into the bag, push it into the mattress and repeat. Two minutes later, you've got a full pad, the down is still dry and your lungs have had a break. Exped
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